Researchers at the University of Kansas have discovered new species of frog found in Mindoro Islands in the Philippines. Scientists first thought that the fanged frog has no difference from the other species, but recognized its distinction because of its unique mating call and key differences in its genome.

In their published findings, the lead author Mark Herr, a doctoral student at the KU Biodiversity Institute and Natural History Museum and Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology said, “Scientists for the last 100 years thought that these frogs were just the same species as frogs on a different island in the Philippines because they couldn’t tell them apart physically. We ran a bunch of analyses — and they do indeed look identical to the naked eye — however, they are genetically isolated. We also found differences in their mating calls. They sound quite different. So, it was a case of using acoustics to determine that the species was different, as well as the new genetic information.”
“This is what we call a cryptic species because it was hiding in plain sight in front of biologists, for many, many years,” he said.

KU scientists worked in Mindoro Islands and gathered genetic samples of the locally popular fanged frog, known scientifically as Limnonectes beloncioi (or commonly as the Mindoro Fanged Frog) several years back but did not conduct the study on them until recently. Scientists thought they were the same species as the ones found in the neighboring Palawan Island named Acanth’s Fanged Frog.

“We ran genetic analyses of these frogs using some specific genetic markers, and we used a molecular clock model just to get a very basic estimate [of] how long we thought that these frogs may have been separated from one another,” Herr said. “We found they’re related to each other, they are each other’s close relatives, but we found they’d been separate for two to six million years — it’s a really long time for these frogs. And it’s very interesting that they still look so similar but sound different.”

A KU graduate student who specializes in studying many species of fanged frogs said frog’s fangs are used most likely in the battle to access prime mating sites and to defend themselves against predators. The Mindoro fanged frog, which is a stream frog, is sometimes hunted by people for food.

カンザス大学の研究者は、フィリピンのミンドロ諸島に生息する新種のカエルを発見しました。科学者たちは当初、このカエルは他の種との違いはないと考えていましたが、独特の交尾の呼び方やゲノムの重要な違いから、この種の特徴を認識しました。

KU生物多様性研究所・自然史博物館・生態進化生物学部門の博士課程学生であるマーク・ハーは、今回の研究成果の中で、「過去100年間の科学者たちは、物理的に見分けることができなかったため、このカエルはフィリピンの別の島に生息するカエルと同種であると考えていました。私たちは様々な分析を行った結果、肉眼では確かに同じように見えますが、遺伝的には隔離されているのです。また、交尾の声にも違いがありました。鳴き声もかなり違います。つまり、新しい遺伝子情報だけでなく、音響学的に種が違うと判断したのです」。
“この種は、生物学者の目の前に、何年も何年も隠れていたので、いわゆる隠蔽種と呼ばれています。

KUの科学者たちはミンドロ諸島で活動し、数年前に科学的にはLimnonectes beloncioi(通称:ミンドロ・ファングド・フロッグ)として知られる地元で人気のあるファングド・フロッグの遺伝子サンプルを集めたが、最近までその研究を行っていなかった。科学者たちは、隣のパラワン島で発見されたアカンサス・ファング・フロッグと同じ種だと考えていた。

“これらのカエルについて、いくつかの特定の遺伝子マーカーを用いて遺伝子解析を行い、分子時計モデルを用いて、これらのカエルがどのくらいの期間、互いに離れていたのかという基本的な推定値を求めました」とHerrは述べています。”しかし、200万年から600万年の間、別々に暮らしていたことがわかりました。これらのカエルにとっては本当に長い時間です。見た目はよく似ているのに、鳴き声が違うというのは非常に興味深いことです」。

多くの種類の牙付きのカエルを専門に研究しているKUの大学院生によると、カエルの牙は、好ましい交尾場所にアクセスするための戦いや、捕食者から身を守るために最もよく使われているという。ミンドロ・ファング・フロッグは小川に生息するカエルで、食用として人間に狩られることもある。

参照元:
https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/31026/20210505/mindoro-fanged-frog-amphibians-philippines.htm
https://bioone.org/journals/ichthyology-and-herpetology/volume-109/issue-1/h2020095/A-New-Morphologically-Cryptic-Species-of-Fanged-Frog-Genus-Limnonectes/10.1643/h2020095.full
https://www.newswise.com/articles/meet-the-freaky-fanged-frog-from-the-philippines